Pop That Goes Crunch!

Seven Decades Of Melodic Rock & Roll

Archive for the tag “Bob Dylan”

Big Star’s “Breathtakingly Beautiful Music”

Today I am reblogging a piece from last month on Big Star. As Brian Westbye notes, they indeed put out “breathtakingly beautiful music.” My earlier post on the band, and “September Gurls” in particular, can be found here: https://popthatgoescrunch.com/2011/12/19/the-greatest-song-you-probably-never-heard/

brian westbye

This is the third installment of a series. Due to the subjective nature of what quantifies a One Hit Wonder, how much of the band must be dead to be a One Hit Wonder With Dead Guys, etc., etc., etc., there will be some shifting of the goal posts across these essays. Such is life and rock ‘n roll.

Goal Post Shift 1: Big Star never got anywhere near a hit. Big Star’s singer/guitarist Alex Chilton did have a #1 – “The Letter” – with his previous band, The Box Tops, for four weeks in the summer of 1967, when he was sixteen (with a much older voice). But the closest Big Star got to the charts during their existence from 1971 – 1974 was nowhere, and the closest they got to public acclaim was in 1998, when the song “In the Street” was appropriated as the theme song of…

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Go-Go Dancing To The Byrds

Groovy 60’s Go-Go Dancing and the Byrds are not often mentioned in the same breath. The Byrds are more associated with folk rock. Their influence can even be heard on The Beatles’ “Help” and “Rubber Soul,” among countless dozens of other records from the mid-60s

Go-Go dancing was big in the mid 60s, and here are the Byrds performing “Feel A Whole Lot Better” in front of a bevy of go-go dancers on a long-forgotten show called “Shivaree.”

The Byrds did, however, help create something brand new in ’65 by adding a back-beat to folk music to make it “danceable.” When Bob Dylan heard their version of “Mr. Tambourine Man,” he supposedly said “Wow, you can dance to that.”

The Byrds’ first four albums with most of the original line-up intact — “Mr. Tambourine Man,” “Turn, Turn, Turn,” “5th Dimension” and “Younger Than Today” — are classics that influenced everyone, most notably R.E.M. and Tom Petty, who covered “Feel A Whole Lot Better” on “Full Moon Fever.”

Some colleagues of mine were exchanging all-time Top Twenty Lists last fall. I put “Feel A Whole Lot Better” on mine. Roger McGuinn’s 12-string Rickenbacker guitar is one of the greatest sounds in rock history, and the song has a great melody and the band’s trademark four-part harmonies. All of that greatness propelled it all the way to Number 103 on the Billboard chart.

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